Eureka Dunes at Death Valley National Park is about 720 feet tall. Death Valley National Park is trhe hottest, lowest and driest place in North America. The highest ground temperature.recorded was 201° F at Furnace Creek on July 15, 1972 with a  max. air temperature of 128° F for that day. Badwater Basin is the lowest place in North America and one of the lowest places in the world at 282 feet below sea level. The Dead Sea, between Israel and Jordan, is the lowest at 1371 feet below sea level. Visitors come to Death Valley to experience the stark and lonely vastness of the valley; the panorama of rugged canyons and mountains; the pleasures of the dry, moderate winter climate; the challenge of the hot, arid summer; the relief of the cooler mountains; and the reminders of frontier and Native American ways of life. Plant and animal species, some of which occur nowhere else in the world, have adapted to the harsh Mojave Desert environment here in remarkable ways. Extremes of climate and geography make it the ultimate showcase of American deserts...Death Valley National Park includes all of Death Valley, a 156-mile-long north/south-trending trough that formed between two major block-faulted mountain ranges: the Amargosa Range on the east and the Panamint Range on the west. Telescope Peak, the highest peak in the Park and in the Panamint Mountains, rises 11,049 feet above sea level.
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Sanddunes